Five Reasons You Need Log Monitoring

You probably regard application logging the way you think of buying auto insurance. You sigh, do it, and hope you never need it. And aren’t you kind of required to do it anyway, or something? Not exactly the scintillating stuff that makes you jump out of bed in the morning.

It feels this way because of how we’ve historically used log files. You dutifully instrument database calls and controller route handlers with information about what’s going on. Maybe you do this by hand, or maybe you use a mature existing tool.  Or maybe you even use something fancy, like aspect-oriented programming (AOP). Whatever your decision, you probably make it early and then further information becomes rote and obligatory.  You forget about it.

At least, you forget about it until, weeks, months, or years later, something happens. Something in production blows up. Hopefully, it’s something innocuous and easily fixed, like your log file getting too big. But more likely some critical and maddeningly intractable production issue has cropped up. And there you sit, scrolling through screens filled with “called WriteEntry() at 2017-04-31 13:54:12,” hoping to pluck the needle of your issue from that haystack.

This represents the iconic use of the log file, dating back decades. And yet it’s an utterly missed opportunity. Your log file can be so much more than just an afterthought and a hail mary for addressing production defects. You just need the right tooling.

Log Monitoring To the Rescue

I’ve talked in the past about one form of upgrade from this logging paradigm: log aggregation. A log aggregation tool brings your log files into one central place, parses them, and allows you to search them rapidly. But you can do even more than that, making use of log monitoring via dashboards.

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The DevOps Job Market

DevOps as a profession and discipline just keeps growing in demand. This year alone, more than 100 global conferences are dedicated to DevOps — and even the “best of” lists are staggering. Hundreds of companies (including Scalyr) are developing tools specifically for the DevOps field, and blogs dedicated to everything from current news and trends to making light of DevOps daily frustrations abound (RIP DevOps Reactions). Even a casual survey of the trending-up of “DevOps” in Google search over the past five years makes it pretty clear that demand for professionals in this space will only continue to rise.

Point. Made. (via Google Trends)

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