Getting Started Quickly With Swift Logging

We’ve covered how to log in seven different languages so far: C#, Java, Python, Ruby, Go, JavaScript, and PHP. We’ve also included a few libraries and platforms, like Log4J, Node.js, Spring Boot, and Rails.

Now, it’s time to talk about Apple’s Swift language. Swift has been slowly gaining in popularity, especially with since its open source release.

I’ll start with a quick example of manual logging in Swift. Then I’ll discuss details of how and why logging matters. Finally, I’ll move on to using Apple’s Unified Logger in a Swift application and how it can improve your ability to monitor applications and track down issues

The code example will be for MacOS, but you can easily adapt it for any Apple platform.

Let’s get to work!

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How to Merge Log Files

You have log files from two or more applications, and you need to see them together. Viewing the data together in proper sequence will make it easier to correlate events, and listing them side-by-side in windows or tabs isn’t cutting it.

You need to merge log files by timestamps.

But just merging them by timestamp isn’t the only thing you need. Many log files have entries with more than one line, and not all of those lines have timestamps on them.

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Getting Started Quickly With PHP Logging

The previous articles in this series covered the basics of logging in C#, Java, Python, Ruby, Node.js, and JavaScript. In this post, I’ll show you how to use logging techniques in yet another very popular language: PHP.

I’ll open with a quick example of manual logging in PHP. Then we’ll revisit the details of why logging matters and what your logs should show. And lastly, I’ll show you how to set up and use the most popular PHP logging framework.

Let’s get started, then!

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How to Create a Docker Image From a Container

In this article, I’ll provide step-by-step instructions on how to create a Docker container, modify its internal state, and then save the container as an image. This is really handy when you are working out how an image should be constructed, because you can just keep tweaking a running container until it works like you want it to. When you’re done, just save it as an image.

Okay, let’s jump right into it.

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Orchestrating Microservices: A Guide for Architects

Well, microservices sure are getting a lot of attention these days. It’s almost uncool to like them, as they are so mainstream. When you have all these separate modules doing their own things, the question inevitably comes up: How do we stitch them together?

The answer? Very carefully. Here are some tips you can use if you find yourself in the position of needing to orchestrate your microservices.

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Microservices Logging Best Practices

Microservice architecture is an application structure that fosters the use of a loosely coupled system to allow you to develop, test, deploy, and release services independently of each other. These services are part of a unique system, and the idea behind using microservices is to break a big problem in smaller problems. Usually, each service interacts with the others through an HTTP endpoint, hiding the details of its technology stack by exposing only a contract to its consumers. Service A will call Service B, which at the same time calls Service C. Once the request chain is complete, Service A might be able to respond to the end customer that initiated the request.

Microservice architecture offers a lot of great benefits like the ability to use different technology stacks, deploy independently, solve small problems one at a time, and more! But using microservices comes with a high cost in that they are complex…not only in how they communicate but also in how to manage them. And they get even more complicated when one or more services fail. Which service failed? Why, and under what circumstances? All these questions are hard to answer if you don’t have good, meaningful logs.

And let’s be honest, we all hate those “unknown” or “something went wrong” system errors. I myself have struggled with the problems that come from a lousy logging strategy. Let me share a few best practices that have helped me when dealing with microservices.

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Log4j2 Configuration: A Detailed Guide to Getting Started

We covered basic logging for Java applications a while back. In that tutorial, we used log4j version 2, a logging framework from the Apache project. Let’s go one step further with Java application logging and look at log4j2 configuration.

Log4j’s capabilities have made it one of Java’s most popular logging frameworks. It can be configured for multiple logging destinations and a variety of log file formats. Log messages can be filtered and directed at the individual class level, giving developers and operations personnel granular control over application messages.

Let’s examine these mechanisms by configuring log4j with a command line Java application.

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Get Started Quickly With Spring Boot Logging

Hot on the heels of the Get Started Quickly With Python Logging and Getting Started Quickly With C++ Logging articles, we’re headed across the coffee shop to look at logging in the context of the Java Spring Boot framework. While we’ve written already on the topic of Java logging in Get Started Quickly With Java Logging, the Spring Boot framework simplifies a lot of the plumbing involved in getting up and running. In this article we’ll learn how to:

  • Create a Spring Boot starter project
  • Use Gradle to build our application
  • Configure the default Spring Boot logger
  • Use Log4j2 with Spring Boot
  • Customize the logging configurations

Grab your Venti red-eye triple espresso with almond milk, and let’s get started!spring_boot_logging_scalyr

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Getting Started With the Rails Logger

Let’s continue our ongoing series on getting starting with loggers for different languages and platforms. Back in March, we covered logging with Ruby; now it’s time to take a look at the platform most often associated with that language, Rails.

We’ll start with a simple application with scaffolding for CRUD operations on a single record. We’ll look at Rails’ default logging configuration and how to use logging in an application. Then we’ll look at how logging can be improved and why you might want to improve it.

This tutorial uses Ruby v2.5.1 and Rails 5.2.0. You’ll need to have them installed to follow along. These instructions will use the command line to create and configure the application and will not rely on a specific IDE or editor. We’ll let Rails use SQLite for the backend database.rails_logger_scalyr

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Getting Started Quickly With C++ Logging

Since publishing my article Get Started Quickly With Python Logging, I’ve been working on a couple of C++ projects where I’ve found a need for more robust logging solutions than a simple time stamp and message written to a file. Since we also have articles on logging for C# and Java, it made sense to continue the series with an article on C++ logging with Boost.Log. Specifically in this article we are going to:

  • Create a simple Visual Studio 2017 project.
  • Install the Boost libraries using the NuGet package manager.
  • Learn how to configure log output formatting.
  • Add custom attributes to our logger.

This article is a big one, so strap in and let’s get started.

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