AWS Lambda Use Cases: 7 Reasons Devs Should Use Lambdas

AWS Lambda is Amazon’s serverless compute service. You can run your code on it without having to manage servers or even containers. It’ll automatically scale depending on how much work you feed into it. You can use it in data pipelines or to respond to web requests or even to compose and send emails. It’s the jack-of-all-trades way to execute code in the AWS cloud.

Although intended for use in the cloud, you can absolutely run Lambdas locally during development. When you do run Lambdas in the cloud, you’ll only pay for what you use. In some cases, this can save significant sums of money compared to the cost of running VMs or containers. While I’ve already touched on some of the reasons you’ll benefit from using AWS Lambdas, I want to focus on seven specific reasons in more detail.

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Microservices Communication: How to Share Data Between Microservices

For some, the ideal picture of a modern application is a collection of microservices that stand alone. The design isolates each service with a unique set of messages and operations. They have a discrete code base, an independent release schedule, and no overlapping dependencies.

As far as I know, this type of system is rare, if it exists at all. It might seem ideal from an architectural perspective, but clients might not feel that way. There’s no guarantee that an application made up of independently developed services will share a cohesive API. Regardless of how you think about Microservices vs. SOA, services should share a standard grammar and microservices communication is not always a design flaw.

The fact is, in most systems you need to share data to a certain degree. In an online store, billing and authentication services need user profile data. The order entry and portfolio services in an online trading system both need market data. Without some degree of sharing, you end up duplicating data and effort. This creates a risk of race conditions and data consistency issues.

At the same time, how do you share data without building a distributed monolithic service instead of a micro? What’s the effective and safe way to implement microservice communication? Let’s take a look at a few different mechanisms.

First, we’ll go over different sharing scenarios. Depending on how you use the data, you can share it via events, feeds, or request/response mechanisms. We’ll take a look at the implications of each scenario.

Then, we’ll cover several different mechanisms for microservice communication, along with an overview of how to use them.

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Top 4 Ways to Make Your Microservices Not Actually Microservices

Microservices have gained such a level of popularity these days that they’re often touted as “the way” to build software. That’s all well and good, except there are a lot of microservice anti-patterns flying around.

The vast majority of microservice systems I’ve seen aren’t really microservices at all. They’re separately deployable artifacts, sure. But they’re built in a way that, for developers, causes more pain than solves problems.

So let’s dive a little more into this. First, we’ll talk about what a microservice was intended to be. Then we’ll get into some of these anti-patterns.

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API vs. Microservices: A Microservice Is More Than Just an API

When writing software, consider both the implementation and the architecture of the code. The software you write is most effective when written in a way that logically makes sense. In addition to being architecturally sound, software should also consider the interaction the user will have with it and the interface the user will experience.

Both the concept of an API and the concept of a microservice involve the structure and interactions of software. A microservice can be misconstrued as simply an endpoint to provide an API. But microservices have much more flexibility and capabilities than that. This article will speak on the differences between APIs and microservices, plus detail some of the benefits a microservice can provide.

To get started, let’s define our terms.

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