Modern software is great, but when it comes to observability, gird your loins!

This won’t come as a shock, but engineers who are on the hook to develop revenue-generating software are quickly moving away from traditional, monolithic architectures and delivering code faster than ever. This trend is especially evident among Scalyr customers, but we wanted to understand how it is generally unfolding and how it affects DevOps observability. We surveyed 155 software development practitioners in DevOps-focused organizations over the last couple of months, and just released our State of DevOps Observability Report. You can download the full report here or check out its summary in this infographic, but in this blog I’ll give you the Cliff’s Notes version of what we found.

Croped infographic on DevOps Observability

We confirmed that organizations really are shifting away from traditional, monolithic architectures. Three-quarters of survey respondents say they deliver at least some of their applications, and more than one-third deliver most of their applications, as microservices. They are also delivering software rapidly, with 71 percent of engineers pushing code into production at least weekly and nearly one-third doing so at least daily. Looking at all of our survey findings through the lens of these two trends, we realize that modern software delivery is putting pressure on DevOps observability.

Here are some of our findings:

Companies are delivering software in a modern way.

  • Three-quarters of respondents deliver some and more than one-third deliver most of their applications as microservices.
  • 71 percent of engineers push code at least once per week, and nearly one-third push code at least once per day.

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The 10 Commandments of Logging

When you search for things on the internet, sometimes you find treasures like this post on logging, e.g. creating meaningful logs.

This post, from a few years back, is authored by Brice Figureau (found on Twitter as @_masterzen_). His blog clearly shows he understand the multiple aspects of DevOps and is worth a visit.

In recent discussions with Brice, he stated that he believes the rules are still quite valid with some tweaks needed for containers and Kubernetes and that in today’s world of GDPR, logging sensitive data is a non -starter. But these rules are informative and worth consideration.

Our thanks to Brice for letting us repost his blog under Creative Commons CC-BY.

Guest author Brice Figureau

2 stone tablets with Roman numerals from 1 to 10
Copyright: moises / 123RF Stock Photo

After writing an answer to a thread regarding monitoring and log monitoring on the Paris DevOps mailing list, I thought back about a blog post project I had in mind for a long time.

I wrote this blog post while wearing my Ops hat and this is mostly addressed to developers.

Knowing how and what to log is, to me, one of the hardest tasks a software engineer will have to solve. Mostly because this task is akin to divination. It’s very hard to know what information you’ll need during troubleshooting… That’s the reason I hope those 10 commandments will help you enhance your application logging for the great benefits of the ops engineers 🙂

1. Thou shalt not write log by yourself

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