Microservices Logging Best Practices

Microservice architecture is an application structure that fosters the use of a loosely coupled system to allow you to develop, test, deploy, and release services independently of each other. These services are part of a unique system, and the idea behind using microservices is to break a big problem in smaller problems. Usually, each service interacts with the others through an HTTP endpoint, hiding the details of its technology stack by exposing only a contract to its consumers. Service A will call Service B, which at the same time calls Service C. Once the request chain is complete, Service A might be able to respond to the end customer that initiated the request.

Microservice architecture offers a lot of great benefits like the ability to use different technology stacks, deploy independently, solve small problems one at a time, and more! But using microservices comes with a high cost in that they are complex…not only in how they communicate but also in how to manage them. And they get even more complicated when one or more services fail. Which service failed? Why, and under what circumstances? All these questions are hard to answer if you don’t have good, meaningful logs.

And let’s be honest, we all hate those “unknown” or “something went wrong” system errors. I myself have struggled with the problems that come from a lousy logging strategy. Let me share a few best practices that have helped me when dealing with microservices.

microservices_logging_best_practices

Read More

Log4j2 Configuration: A Detailed Guide to Getting Started

We covered basic logging for Java applications a while back. In that tutorial, we used log4j version 2, a logging framework from the Apache project. Let’s go one step further with Java application logging and look at log4j2 configuration.

Log4j’s capabilities have made it one of Java’s most popular logging frameworks. It can be configured for multiple logging destinations and a variety of log file formats. Log messages can be filtered and directed at the individual class level, giving developers and operations personnel granular control over application messages.

Let’s examine these mechanisms by configuring log4j with a command line Java application.

log4j2_configuration_guide_scalyr

Read More

Getting Started Quickly With C++ Logging

Since publishing my article Get Started Quickly With Python Logging, I’ve been working on a couple of C++ projects where I’ve found a need for more robust logging solutions than a simple time stamp and message written to a file. Since we also have articles on logging for C# and Java, it made sense to continue the series with an article on C++ logging with Boost.Log. Specifically in this article we are going to:

  • Create a simple Visual Studio 2017 project.
  • Install the Boost libraries using the NuGet package manager.
  • Learn how to configure log output formatting.
  • Add custom attributes to our logger.

This article is a big one, so strap in and let’s get started.

getting_started_quickly_with_c++_logging_scalyr

Read More

The 10 Commandments of Logging

When you search for things on the internet, sometimes you find treasures like this post on logging, e.g. creating meaningful logs.

This post, from a few years back, is authored by Brice Figureau (found on Twitter as @_masterzen_). His blog clearly shows he understand the multiple aspects of DevOps and is worth a visit.

In recent discussions with Brice, he stated that he believes the rules are still quite valid with some tweaks needed for containers and Kubernetes and that in today’s world of GDPR, logging sensitive data is a non -starter. But these rules are informative and worth consideration.

Our thanks to Brice for letting us repost his blog under Creative Commons CC-BY.

Guest author Brice Figureau

2 stone tablets with Roman numerals from 1 to 10
Copyright: moises / 123RF Stock Photo

After writing an answer to a thread regarding monitoring and log monitoring on the Paris DevOps mailing list, I thought back about a blog post project I had in mind for a long time.

I wrote this blog post while wearing my Ops hat and this is mostly addressed to developers.

Knowing how and what to log is, to me, one of the hardest tasks a software engineer will have to solve. Mostly because this task is akin to divination. It’s very hard to know what information you’ll need during troubleshooting… That’s the reason I hope those 10 commandments will help you enhance your application logging for the great benefits of the ops engineers 🙂

1. Thou shalt not write log by yourself

Read More